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FTP “Lack of Security” Exposed

Posted by on Monday, 24 January, 2011

Apollo Project CSM Simulator Computers and ConsolesFTP was designed as an easy mechanism for exchanging files between computers at a time when networks were new and information security was an immature science. In the 1970s, if you wanted to secure a server from unwanted access, you simply locked the computer room door. User access to data was controlled by the basic User ID and password scenario. (Right is a reminder of how much technology has advanced since the 1970s. The photograph,  taken December 11, 1975, is the Apollo Project CSM Simulator Computers and Consoles. Photo Courtesy of NASA.)

The Internet did not yet exist and the personal computer revolution was still a decade away.

Today, the security of business file transfers is of paramount importance. The exchange of business records between computing systems, between enterprises, and even across international borders has become critical to the global economy.

Yet, the original native FTP facility of TCP/IP wasn’t designed for the requirements of the modern, globally connected enterprise. FTP’s basic security mechanisms – the User ID and password — have long ago been outdated by advances in network sleuthing technologies, hackers, malware, and the proliferation of millions of network-attached users.

Risks associated with using native (standard) FTP include:

  • Native FTP does not encrypt data.
  • A user’s name and password are transferred in clear text when logging on and can therefore be easily recognized.
  • The use of FTP scripts or batch files leaves User IDs and passwords in the open, where they can easily be hacked.
  • FTP alone, does not meet compliance regulations. (For example: HIPAA, SOX, State Privacy Laws, etc.)
  • When using an FTP connection, the transferred data could “stray” to a remote computer and not arrive at their intended destination leaving your data exposed for third parties or hackers to intercept.
  • Conventional FTP does not natively maintain a record of file transfers.

The first step is to examine how FTP is being used in your organization. The next step is to identify how your organization needs to manage and secure everyone’s file transfers. The final step is to evaluate what type of Managed File Transfer Product your company needs.

For more information download our White Paper – Beyond FTP: Securing and Managing File Transfers.

Linoma Renews IBM Advanced Business Partner Level

Posted by on Monday, 20 December, 2010

IBM Advanced Business PartnerAchieving and maintaining the IBM Advanced Business Partner level is completely based on product quality and customer satisfaction. IBM assigns their partner levels for ISV’s (independent software vendors), like Linoma Software, on customer feedback.

Linoma Software actively produces five products that run natively on the IBM i (iSeries).

What is the benefit of Advanced Partnership? Quite simply, Advanced Partners have direct access to resources within IBM. Linoma Software has a direct connection to IBM support, labs and knowledge-base. The Advanced Partnership also provides Linoma Software the ability to test against upcoming software, like the recent i7.1 operating system for IBM i and p systems, before it is released to the public.

Linoma Software is a long-time IBM Advanced Business Partner and is well known for its dedication to high quality software, user-friendly applications, and outstanding technical support. With over 3000 satisfied business customers ranging from small business to Fortune 100, government entities and not-for-profit organizations – Linoma Software provides the same level of expertise to all.

“We work with thirty-plus vendors for all our ‘Power System’ related software, and no one has better technical support staff than Linoma Software. When I call other vendors, I anticipate multiple levels of call routing, and if I’m lucky the person may be able to research a solution. With Linoma’s support team, it’s always been the first person, and they’ve handled the issue with the feel of a practiced hand who recognized my problem and had a solution ready immediately.” Shaun Skelton – Berry Plastics

Transferring Large Files over the Internet? A Few Managed File Transfer Recommendations

Posted by on Monday, 29 November, 2010

Internet File TransfersRecent posts on this blog have outlined reasons to consider installing a file transfer system that will help streamline productivity and secure the transfer of sensitive documents. We understand that selecting a product can be time consuming. To help you make the most educated decision here are a few more helpful suggestions to consider when selecting a managed file transfer solution.

  • Easy to learn and easy to use – The managed file transfer (MFT) system you choose should have an intuitive interface that can be learned quickly. No programming skills should be required. If it isn’t easy to use, end-users and non-IT personnel will shy away from using it.
  • Audit trails – The secure file transfer solution should produce comprehensive audit trails of all file transfer activity and support SYSLOG feeds to a central logging server.
  • Produces alerts – An automated file transfer solution should be able to send you email alerts or texts instantly when problems occur.
  • Password security – The managed file service you choose should not show password values on any screens or logs. Encrypts all passwords that are stored.
  • Remote access – The file transfer product allows for remote administration and monitoring of file transfers, preferably through the browser.
  • Web site transfers – The file transfer solution needs the ability to support HTTP and HTTPS protocols for transferring data.

A managed file transfer solution can not only save your department time, but it can also save you money. A comprehensive solution will enable you to complete menial tasks and allow your department to concentrate on the larger picture.

Did I mention we have a managed file transfer product…GoAnywhere? GoAnywhere allows organizations to secure and automate the exchange of data with their trading partners, customers, employees and internal systems. Still not sure what you are looking for? We offer a free product trial and we would be happy to schedule a demo to go over how GoAnywhere can help your company.

Related Blog Post: Top 10 Managed File Transfer Considerations

Top 10 Managed File Transfer Considerations

Posted by on Monday, 8 November, 2010

Before looking for a managed file transfer solution, it is important to determine how data is currently being transferred from your organization. You should find out what users and applications are performing the data transfers, where the source of the data resides, how sensitive the data is, how the data is formatted for the partners and what pGoAnywhere Managed File Transferrotocols are used to transmit the information. If the files are encrypted or compressed before transmission, find out what tools and standards are being utilized.

After you’ve done your in-house analysis, then start a search for a secure file transfer solution that best fits your needs. Listed below are the Top 10 managed file transfer considerations.

1. Platform Openness – To reduce the points of connection to sensitive data and reduce the risk of exposure to those without a need-to-know the MFT solution should be installed on the server operating system where the sensitive data and applications reside. If your corporate data mostly resides on the IBM i, then it would make sense to get a MFT solution that runs on the IBM i.

2. Authorization Controls – To meet many compliance regulations, the MFT solution must provide role based access to limit user access to certain servers or MFT functions based on user credentials.

3. Secure FTP – Plain FTP is not secure. The MFT solution must support both SFTP (FTP over SSH) and FTPS (FTP over SSL) protocols for secure FTP transfers.

4. Encryption Standards – At minimum, the solution should support the industry standard encryption standards: AES, Open PGP, AS2, SSH, SSL, TLS and S/MIME.

5. Database Integration – The MFT should readily connect to DB2, SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL and other popular database servers for extracting and inserting data.

6. Data Transformation – Is the ability to translate data between popular data formats including XML, CSV, Excel and fixed-width text formats.

7. Data Compression – Compresses and packages data using popular standards such as ZIP, GZIP and TAR to reduce transmission times.

8. Application Integration – The MFT should provide commands and APIs for interfacing with your applications.

9. Scheduling – Allows transfers and other MFT functions to be scheduled for future dates and times.

10. Key Management – Does the MFT include management tools for creating, importing and exporting keys and certificates?

Related Blog Post: What Qualifies a Product as a Managed File Transfer Solution?

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